Is it wrong to be wealthy?

FLOYD ROGERS – Texas Gospel Volunteer, Christian writer

A YouTube video titled, “Why most rich people will end up in hell” was brought up in discussion. For full disclosure: I did not watch the video.  I’ve found that a person usually doesn’t really know what they’re talking about if they can’t make a point without telling me to watch someone else’s video. But the title piqued my interest.  After all, the Book of Matthew does say, “Again I tell you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for someone who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.”

The Bible uses a lot of metaphor. Its books are written in the common-person’s language. People back then were not that different from modern folks who use metaphors like saying my car died on the way to work.  We know the person who says this doesn’t believe their car was alive.  I think Matthew is using a similar metaphor here. I don’t think he’s saying it’s impossible for a rich person to go to heaven, but that it can be very hard for a rich person to do so.  But why?

Our redemption is a gift from God.  We don’t earn it, but we can reject it.  We can also allow things to become more important than God and money can become a stumbling block. Too, other types of wealth can cause us problems. Consider that the book of Matthew says, “Anyone who loves their father or mother more than me is not worthy of me…” It’s not wrong to love your family, but it is wrong to love people more than God.  The point I’m making is that a thing does not have to be intrinsically evil to become a stumbling block. Could this be why Matthew records Jesus asking, “What will it profit a man if he gains the whole world, yet forfeits his soul?”

What are your thoughts?

StowTown Records Releases Highly-anticipated Brotherhood Project

SPECIAL STOWTOWN RECORDS

Nashville, TN (November 20, 2020) – Collectively, they have enjoyed more than 100 accolades, industry honors and fan awards. Over the past two decades they have received multiple Grammy® nominations and GMA Dove Awards, as well as countless Fan Awards from The Singing News Magazine. Since bursting onto the Gospel Music scene, Ernie Haase & Signature Sound and The Booth Brothers have each established their place firmly atop the genre’s ladder of success. Thus, in 2015 when the announcement was made by IMC Concerts that these two groups would be uniting for multiple concert events, excitement abounded from fans nationwide. 

Obviously, the live concert events proved to be a tremendous success with sold-out crowds each night. From those live events comes a brand new release from StowTown RecordsBrotherhood, by Ernie Haase & Signature Sound & The Booth Brothers, features two of the most acclaimed artists at their very best. This collection of camaraderie, laughter and timeless music allows fans the opportunity to own a collective piece of history that can be enjoyed day after day.

IMC Concerts & StowTown Records President Landon Beene shares, “When the idea of bringing these two artists together was first presented to us, we knew it would be something special. Their talents flowed together extremely well on stage and it was an electrifying event. We are thrilled to make it available as a live recording.”

The recording features timeless classics, delivered with the same infectious energy that has attributed to the overwhelming success these two groups have enjoyed over the years. From start to finish, this recording truly captures the bonds of brotherhood these talented individuals share.

Brotherhood is distributed by Provident/Sony and is available on all digital platforms worldwide and wherever fine Christian music is sold, including christianbook.combarnesandnoble.com, and amazon.com

Brotherhood Track Listing:
Life’s Railway to Heaven
Home
All the Gold in California
Jesus Is Coming Soon
I’ll Fly Away
Sweet Beulah Land
Going Home
In the Garden
Look for me at Jesus’ Feet

Do you pretend to know someone else’s heart?

FLOYD ROGERS, TEXAS GOSPEL CANADA VOLUNTEER

There are two words I’ve heard Christians and non-Christians alike use to start sentences during an argument. The two-word preface may carry more implications than some would like to admit.  The words are: “You want…”

In the heat of argument one may say, “You want to cause trouble…” or “You want to seem smart…” sort of poisoning the well, if you wish, as they portray their opponent as someone with a malicious motive rather than someone with whom they disagree.

Consider, 1 Samuel tells us, “The Lord does not see as man sees; for the man looks at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart.” 1 Corinthians in the New Testament tells us, “…who knows a person’s thoughts except their own spirit.” There are other scriptures that seem to say God alone is capable of knowing someone’s true motivation.

It may be comforting to believe that the only way someone could disagree with us about important matters is if they have some nefarious incentive. But given that we can only guess what goes on within someone else’s heart, should we really speak as if we have the ability to do so? Too, shouldn’t we ask God to make sure we understand our own motives before casting judgement on others?

What are your thoughts?

Can people tell you are a Christian by what you post on Facebook?

I once told a woman that what she posted online was not very Christian at all. She responded by telling me, “We aren’t in church and I’m not bound to any biblical rules or principles. This is FB and we make the rules.”

There is at least a grain of truth in that statement: We can choose to go against God’s principles. God does not force us to live as we should. Is it not hypocritical to claim you are following Jesus while purposely doing our own thing?  Doesn’t this misrepresent to the world what being a Christian means?

What are your thoughts?

There is a difference between judging what a person does and judging the individual

FLOYD ROGERS, TEXAS GOSPEL CANADA VOLUNTEER

The Book of Mathew says, “Judge not, or you too will be judged.” Does this mean that Christians should never judge the actions of others?  I believe this scripture and the answer to the question show just how easy it is to get a wrong understanding of the Bible if you only hear a snippet. The same Chapter of Matthew says that Jesus told His followers how to know a false prophet. He said, “By their fruit you will recognize them.” He is clearly telling Christians to make a judgement about a person’s actions.

Notice, he says to judge the actions, not the individual. The Bible warns us against actions that go against God’s will.  The Bible warns us against adultery, murder, etc. I believe this makes it clear we are to judge actions. But when it comes to judging the individual; that is, assuming we know why he or she did the action, that’s a different story. We have no idea what lies in a person’s heart , but God does. He alone judges the heart. Doesn’t this mean that only God judges the individual?

How would other folks judge you if they only saw you at your worst?

What are your thoughts?